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  • THE PROGRAMMATIC ADVERTISING REPORT: Mobile, Video, and Real-Time Bidding Will Catapult Programmatic Ad Spend

    Real TimeBiddingDigitalAdSales

    Programmatic platforms are on pace to fundamentally reshape the entire digital advertising landscape.

    These platforms are automating much of the ad buying and selling process and increasing the accuracy of execution. Programmatic technologies are helping ad buyers find the right audience at the right price at the right time.

    new report from BI Intelligence finds that real-time bidding (RTB), a key piece of the programmatic ecosystem, will account for over $18.2 billion in U.S. digital ad revenues in 2018, up from just $3.1 billion in 2013.

    In the report, BI Intelligence looks at the drivers of programmatic adoption, sizes up the programmatic market, and outlines the barriers that some advertisers and publishers face when adopting programmatic technologies.

    Access The Full Report By Signing Up For A Free Trial

    Here are some of the key takeaways from the report:

    The report is full of charts and data that can easily be downloaded and put to use.

    In full, the report: 

    For full access receive to all BI Intelligence's analysis, reporting, and downloadable charts on the digital media industry, sign up for a free trial.

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-programmatic-ad-report-2014-7

  • Dick's Sporting Goods Beautifully Captures The Intensity Of Sports In New Ad [THE BRIEF]

    Dick's Sporting Goods strikes again with the help of Anomally. The dramatic new 60-second spot shows a number of young players training and performing on the field. It's set to an epic ballad and ends with the line "Every moment, every journey, every dream, every season starts at Dick's." 

    Apple released a new ad called "Stickers" Monday night. The new spot, which dropped last night just in time for Apple's earnings report, is set to a techno beat and shows MacBooks covered in different stickers from Homer Simpson to Cookie Monster. 

    Yahoo acquired mobile ad service Flurry on Monday for an unreported price, rumored to be somewhere in the hundreds of millions. 

    New York-based digital agency Kettle tapped Amanda Hughes-Watkins as its new creative director and Crystal Ginn as senior producer. 

    Omnicom Group's net income shot up over 13% from last year, reaching a high of more than $318 million, Adweek reports. 

    Verizon launched a rewards program that will benefit advertisers by helping them produce more targeted ads. The mobile company will award customers if they provide information like their location, their app usage data, and other personal details, The Wall Street Journal reports. 

    A three-year-long court battle between agency WPP and Kantar and TRA, research and analytics company's owned by TiVo, ended on Monday with both sides agreeing to not move forward with a trial.  

    Facebook launched a new feature on Monday called Save, Ad Age reports. With Save, users can bookmark anything from a link to a video that they see on their news feed. Users can even save ads, but advertisers will not be able to target ads if a user saves their page or video. 

    Previously on Business Insider Advertising:

     

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/dicks-sporting-goods-ad-the-brief-2014-7

  • 29 Eye-Tracking Heatmaps Reveal Where People Really Look

    They say the eyes tell all. Now thanks to eye-tracking technology we can tell they're saying. Tracking eye movements can give us fascinating insights into advertising and design and reveal a few things about human tendencies.

    We've picked out some of our favorites below:

    Everyone focuses on Scarlett Johansson's face in this Dolce & Gabbana ad.

    scarlett johansson ad

    Here you can see how the eyes follow a few different animations.

    cokead

    goat

    animation2

    In this package of meat, people look at the meat right away. Then, they read the label and check out the sticker.

    beef heatmap

    In this viewing of The Last Supper, people are looking at Jesus and the apostles. The eyes also seem to naturally fall on that space between two of the back windows.

    heatmap 16

    Grocery shoppers are mostly looking for prices.

    heatmap 18

    This is a gaze plot. It shows how people are checking out a shelf full of shampoo.

    shampoo_gazeplo5t

    No one seems to care about this Porsche. They'd rather read.

    porsche

    This one shows the differences between men and women. Men spend more time looking at the woman, while women read the rest of the ad.

    heatmap1

    Notice how the men are not looking at the shoes at all.heatmap 2

    Men focus on baseball players' torso more than women, who look only at the face.

    heatmap 8

    Viewers of both genders are more likely to look at the woman's face. On the guy's profile, they're reading the text.

    heatmap 17

    Despite the really long beard, people still focus on the face in this one.

    PR Study Enhanced Buzzwide Heat Map

    Place a product slightly left of center in a store display to get it the most attention.

    heatmap 17

    There's a lot going on on this version of the New York Times' homepage. Images and special text boxes won out.

    heatmap 18

    This Smartwater ad does a pretty good job of getting people to notice the bottle of water. But they're also checking out the model's shoulder.

    PR study Smart water Heat Map

    These Sunsilk ads show that just putting a pretty face on a copy isn't enough. It matters where she's looking.

    heatmap 3

    This Pepsi can is just as eye-catching as the woman's face.

    56

    Notice how much people focus on the jewelry.

    main6

    This image shows "banner blindness," revealing a potential problem with banner ads.
    heatmap 4

    On Google, the top five listings on the page get the majority of eyeballs. Everything else can be considered below the fold.

    99

    On Facebook, photos catch the most eyes.

    heatmap 8

    Here's what people look at during a soccer match. They're focused on the player throwing in the ball and the area he's facing

    heatmap 8

    Even though there's a large picture of a man's face on this billboard, more people were looking at the words on the left.

    heatmap 9

    Women tend to focus on the face and the torso...

    heatmap 10

    While men focus more on the groin ...heatmap 10

    What do people look at when they see the Vegas strip? The eye looks straight ahead and then veers back to the left.

    u

    In the six seconds they spend on a resume, recruiters focus on name, current and past position titles and dates, and education.

    heatmap 11

    A few of these images were contributions from Sticky. Sticky lets companies to conduct their own biometric online eye-tracking.


    NOW WATCH: This Is Exactly What A Hiring Manager Scans For When Reviewing Resumes

     

    SEE ALSO: 19 Things That Heatmaps Reveal About The Internet

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/eye-tracking-heatmaps-2014-7

  • Can You Identify These Brands By Their Signature Fonts Alone?

    Canon logo

    Earlier this month, we talked about how brands use color to establish their place in consumers' minds.

    But that's not the only way companies use subtle imagery to make connections with people. Sometimes simply choosing the right font can convey important messages. For instance, Canon's logo uses sharp corners to indicate the level of precision its products boast, while Tumblr's logo highlights the company's minimalist aesthetic

    We used the fonts of some of the world's most distinctive logos to spell out new words. See if you can figure out which brands the letters belong to.

    Hint: Entertainment



    The Disney logo is based on founder Walt Disney's personal signature.



    Hint: Tech



    See the rest of the story at Business Insider ..

    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/name-these-brands-by-their-signature-fonts-2014-7

  • Why Vice Is Worth Exponentially More Than Other Digital Media Companies

    shane smith

    Earlier this month, Sky News reported that Vice Media was in talks to sell a major stake to Time Warner in a deal that would value the youth-focused digital-media company at $2.2 billion.

    Though Vice CEO and cofounder Shane Smith has said in the past that Vice could be worth as much as $30 billion on the stock market if it were to go public, the Time Warner deal would peg the 20-year-old company as being worth nearly as much as the 163-year-old New York Times Co. and exponentially more than most of its competitors in the digital-media space.

    It has been speculated — though not confirmed — that the deal will put Vice in control of a 24-hour cable news network, which would occupy the cable station that is home to the Time Warner-owned HLN. Vice declined to comment on the reported investment talks.

    The Time Warner news might surprise those who know Vice primarily for its "hipster" magazine, distributed free in American Apparel stores and other places.

    But the company has spent the past decade building a robust advertising and licensing machine, the strength of which lies in a prescient early bet on the viability of online video and a creative approach to monetizing its content.

    In a world where publications born in print have struggled to make money on the web, Vice's business is only getting bigger, Smith has said.

    Vice generated more revenues in the first quarter of 2014 than it did in all of 2013, Smith told Business Insider at the end of May, affirming an earlier statement that the company would bring in $500 million this year and $1 billion by 2016.

    By comparison, BuzzFeed, a notable competitor in the digital youth media market, is aiming to make $120 million this year.

    ‘We Shoot It, We Cut It, It’s Up The Next Day’

    Today, online video fetches some of the internet's highest advertising rates, and the numbers have spurred increased video production from The New York Times to AOL and everyone in between.

    When Vice began to wade into internet video in 2006, the medium was still in its infancy.

    Its first experiments were published on DVDs, but the company was frustrated by the time it took to bring programming to market. It took a year for its newsmagazine DVD, “The Vice Guide to Travel,” to be made into physical disks and shipped to stores. Smith said that by the time customers were able to get their hands on the DVD, a sort of R-rated National Geographic, the stories were no longer relevant.

    In partnership with Viacom, Vice launched an online video network called VBS.tv, back when the technology was known not as "streaming video" but by its technical name, TV over IP, or television over internet protocol.

    At VBS.tv, Vice translated its unique style of print journalism to video, supervised by the well-known director Spike Jonze. Viewers could enjoy dispatches from Vice staffers, including Smith himself, as they shopped for black-market weapons in Bulgaria and hunted for mutated animals at the site of the Chernobyl disaster in Ukraine — and they could do it in a timely way.

    "We said, 'We just want to shoot stuff that people can see right away,'" Smith said. "We shoot it, we cut it, it’s up the next day. That was the idea behind VBS.tv."

    Shane Smith Vice Bulgaria

    Vice ultimately bought out Viacom's stake in its online video operations and expanded its content offerings to touch a range of what Spencer Baim, Vice's chief strategic officer, calls "passion points," topics like music, fashion, and travel that young people care about deeply.

    Vice now has its own Emmy-nominated documentary series on HBO and plans to produce upwards of 2,000 hours of video content in 2014. The Brooklyn-based company employs more than 1,000 people at offices in 36 countries.

    "We understood early on that the most engaging way, the most emotional way to connect to someone is through video," Baim said. "The video we make is artful, it’s poetic, and it looks really beautiful whether you see it on a small screen or on a movie screen."

    If nothing else, the videos are certainly popular. The company’s main YouTube account has 4.7 million subscribers, and Smith says Vice videos have been viewed more than 1 billion times on the platform.

    Selling To The Highest Bidder

    Despite the success of VBS.tv, Vice has lately embraced a platform-neutral strategy. If Vice's content is worth watching, the theory goes, it doesn't matter whether people see it on television, YouTube, or the company's website.

    Smith said that with demand for original television content rising and production budgets on the decline, Vice has been able to dramatically increase its profit margins by licensing content it has already created to the highest bidders around the world — be they state television stations in China, cable networks in Europe, or film distributors in the U.S.

    Vice has a news show in Italy made up of content from its U.S. HBO show coupled with pieces of original Italy-focused reporting, and it plans to launch similar programs in countries across Europe.

    Smith said that these licensing fees were the primary reason his company earned more revenues in the first quarter of 2014 than it did during all of 2013.

    "We used to believe much more in owned and operated content. We felt we had to own every eyeball, but now it doesn't matter," he explained to me last month. "As long as you’re growing an audience that’s branded, and you’re making money, then who the f--- cares? It’s actually very restricting to keep everything on your own platform."Vice Italia

    The Vice Guide To Brands

    When Vice does run its content on its own web properties, advertising partners like Intel, 7 Up, and North Face are more than happy to help foot the bill in exchange for access to Vice's valuable youth audience.

    According to the company’s media kit, given to prospective advertisers, Vice visitors are primarily affluent young males.

    And Vice has a multitude of ways to help brands looking to bask in the company's youthful cool, selling everything from banner ads to custom-made in-house advertising solutions. As a result, a single program can bring in several streams of revenue.  

    Take this video about a woman's life lived in isolation in the wilderness of Siberia. Not all of Vice's content carries this much branding — some carries none at all — but it's a good example of how many different ways Vice makes money off its video:

    Vice skitch 2.jpg

    The film in question is an episode of "Far Out," a video series about people living in remote locations sponsored by the outdoor apparel company North Face. According to a 2013 article in The New Yorker, a brand can sponsor 12 episodes of one of Vice's 70 original video series for anywhere between $1 million and $5 million.

    When I watched the video earlier this month, I was first shown a preroll ad for "Captivated by Her," a documentary made by Vice's technology site, Motherboard, about a design and technology workshop inspired by the film “Her.”

    The documentary is sponsored by Warner Bros. and Microsoft and accompanied by a link to purchase “Her” on DVD. Conveniently, the 2013 film was directed by the aforementioned Spike Jonze, Vice’s longtime friend and collaborator.

    There's more.

    On top of the “Far Out” page is a banner ad for Ray-Ban, created by Vice’s in-house advertising and creative services studio, Virtue. It features a link to a YouTube video Virtue made for Ray-Ban that follows the electronic music duo Chromeo on a trip to the studio.

    On this one solitary webpage, Vice made money from four different brands five different ways, and promoted the work of an old friend.

    And another thing: Although Chromeo, the group featured in the Ray-Ban ad, is signed to Atlantic Records, the duo has previously released music on Vice’s record label and maintains a close relationship with the company.

    The Drawbacks Of Synergy

    While Vice’s marketing mojo is the envy of its peers, its aggressive synergies have brought accusations that Vice is blurring the longstanding line between editorial content and advertising.

    In May, Gawker published a story in which current and former Vice employees, all of them anonymous, accused the company of regularly editing content to appease sponsors and said Vice sometimes conceived entire shows for the purpose of luring in advertisers.

    The claims directly contradict Smith’s statement, reported by The Guardian in March, that “no programming has ever been edited for a sponsor,” as well as Baim’s statement to Business Insider that programs are conceived as stand-alone editorial shows before being shopped to brands that might want to sponsor them.

    When asked for comment on Gawker’s claims, a Vice representative offered a terse response: “It’s laughable.”

    The Next Battle

    While competitors such as BuzzFeed and The New York Times are investing heavily in video production, Vice's early bet on the market has allowed it to build a degree of scale that makes its online video empire difficult to replicate, especially given how expensive it is to create quality content.

    "BuzzFeed is doing content, which, by the way, is great," Smith told me after making a presentation to prospective YouTube advertisers at the end of April. But to be really successful, he added, that’s not sufficient. "The problem is that it can’t be one hour, it can't be two hours, it can't be 20 hours. It has to be 2,000 hours,” he said.

    "Everyone’s talking about premium content. Great, you can have five hours of premium content, that’s a TV show. How do you get to 5,000 hours of premium content, which is a network? That’s going to be the next battle.”

    Vice News Ukraine

    To that end, Vice is ramping up its efforts with the recent roll-out of channels about food and sports.

    Its online news channel, launched in March, has earned plaudits for on-the-ground reporting from Ukraine and will begin running advertising with partners this month.

    From there, Smith hopes to take his brand of gonzo journalism wherever news is consumed.

    “I remember when Vice first started, people would say, 'Oh, I was in Germany and I saw a Vice thing, or 'I was in London and I went to a Vice party' or 'I was in Barcelona and I ran into Vice guys,' and that sort of built, and now it’s, like, ‘Oh, fuck, they’re everywhere,’" Smith told me in May.

    "And I think the next stage of that is you’re in a hotel in Barcelona, and you’re going to turn on the news, and it’s going to be Vice. You’re going to be in France, you’re going to be in Ireland. It’s going to be Vice.”

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-vice-will-make-500-million-in-2014-2014-6

  • These New Technologies Are Making Smartphones Less Cluttered, More Personalized, And Better At Completing Tasks

    AverageAppsPerPhone

    Smartphones are the most personal of consumer electronics devices, and yet they aren't actually all that great at helping users find what they're looking for. The devices are often cluttered with apps, difficult to navigate, and not particularly useful when it comes to completing multistep tasks.

    Trying to improve these aspects of the smartphone experience is one of the top priorities of Apple and Google, as well as a host of new apps. These companies are offering services from app launchers to custom lock screens to smart personal agents and intelligent personal assistants (e.g., Google Now), and task automation tools.

    In a recent report on mobile personalization, BI Intelligence takes a more in-depth look at each of these categories, and examines some of the well-known apps or technologies that fall under each, including Google Now, Apple's Siri, and IFTTT (If This Then That), among others. We also look at the opportunity these new apps and services are creating to deliver personalized ads and marketing to consumers. 

    Consider the boom underway in usage of personalization services on just Android phones: 

    With consumers responding favorably and usage taking off, expect many more mobile app companies to enter the field, particularly on Android.

    Why is customization/personalization important? 

    In full, the report:

    For full access to the Personalization Report and all BI Intelligence's charts, data, and analysis on the mobile industry sign up for a free trial subscription today. 

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/new-technologies-make-smartphones-less-cluttered-more-personal-2014-7

  • Fred Armisen Anonymously Calls Payphones For Heineken Social Experiment Campaign [THE BRIEF]

    Fred Armisen is one of the new faces of Heineken, along with Neil Patrick Harris. In this new video, Armisen calls a payphone in New York City asking anyone who answers to meet him across the street. The ad is part of Heineken's "social experiment," according to Ad Age. 

    Time Inc. CEO Joe Ripp will create an eight-person team dedicated to making native ads, or ads that look similar to the editorial content, according to The Drum.  

    Following the release of Airbnb's new mildly sexual looking logo, Mashable reports that a Tumblr page was created to collect the most humorous depictions of what the logo really looks like. 

    TubeMogul, a "video-ad-buying software company," went public on Friday. The stock exploded on its first day of trading. So far, it's only up a little in pre-market trading today.

    Tech company Pivotstack created a "Top 50 Ad Agencies" list according to Adweek. The site took into account the number of likes or followers an agency had on Facebook, Twitter, and Linkedin and also the amount of traffic and agency's website had. Agencies at the top of the list include Ogilvy & Mather, IDEO, and Wieden + Kennedy.   

    Media Post reports that should Fox buy Time Warner, CBS might look into buying CNN.  

    Previously on Business Insider Advertising:

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/fred-armisen-stars-in-heineken-ad-the-brief-2014-7

  • BLOOMBERG: Rupert Murdoch Is Considering Selling Sky Assets To Get $13.5 Billion More For Its Time Warner Bid

  • A Group Of Adults Were Taught An Incredible Lesson After They Were Asked To 'Run Like A Girl'

    "What does it mean to do something like a girl?" Well, that's what a few young women and a few young men were asked by a bunch of executives from Always.

    Their response was troubling. When asked to run like a girl, this is what happened.

    The women ran like this:

    LikeAGirl2

    And like this:

    LikeAGirl3

    The men ran like this:

    LikeAGirl4

    Then everyone was asked to "fight like a girl."

    LikeAGirl6

    And throw like a girl:

    LikeAGirl8

    "Do you think you're insulting your sister when you do that?" An exec asks the younger boy with the yellow tee-shirt. He looks shocked.

    "No," he says. "Insulting to girls but not to my sister."

    But then they asked young girls to do the same thing — run, throw, and fight like girls. They didn't have the same reaction that the older folks did. 

    LikeAGirl9

    "What does it mean to 'run like a girl,'" an exec asks.

    "To run as fast as you can," a little girl tells her, before darting across the room.

    LikeAGirl101

    After seeing that the young girls didn't view doing something "like a girl" as an insult, the older women and men reflected on why that was, and why they thought "like a girl" had become such a bad thing. When they were asked if they wanted a chance to re-do their action, they all said yes.

    You can watch the entire ad for Always (#LikeAGirl) below. 

     

     

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/like-a-girl-ad-by-always-2014-7

  • How Brooklyn Brewery Tripled Sales In 5 Years Without Traditional Advertising

    steve hindy glass

    There's a good chance you've tried or at least heard of Brooklyn Brewery's products. Its beer is stocked in restaurants, bars, and retailers in 26 U.S. states and 20 countries, and it's on track to sell 270,000 barrels of beer by the end of this year.

    That's why it may surprise you that the company has achieved this success without placing any ads.

    Despite its lack of traditional television, print, and online advertising, Brooklyn Brewery has tripled sales in the past five years. It's done so by sponsoring events in its main distribution regions and telling a story that hooks people.

    "It took us 20 years to get to 100,000 barrels sold [in a year]," brewery cofounder Steve Hindy tells Business Insider, "and just three years to go from that to 200,000." 

    Brooklyn Brewery, founded in 1988, brought in $16 million in revenue in 2008. Last year, the company had $50 million in revenue and sold 216,000 barrels.

    This meteoric growth is partly due to timing. Consumers embracing craft beers over bigger names like Budweiser, the rejuvenation of Brooklyn, and the rise of social media all contributed. But Hindy says the seeds were planted from the very beginning, 26 years ago.

    When Hindy founded the company with Tom Potter, they didn't have enough money for traditional advertising, but even once they had more funds, they realized it wasn't for them. They tried a series of radio ads on sports radio in the early 2000s, which Hindy says "never really felt right."

    Instead, the pair decided to take a more grassroots approach and grow the brand through word of mouth. They wanted their customers to discover it themselves at an event or in a bar, hoping it would give them a sense of ownership.

    Rather than commercials, they invested in community outreach. This entailed sponsoring local art events in Brooklyn and led to relationships with organizations like the Brooklyn Museum and the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). Those who attended these events would get free beer and the local business owners and artists running the events would appreciate the support and keep in touch.

    "The board can't quantify being a good neighbor," Hindy says with a laugh, "but it's been very satisfying for us."

    kegging line

    In the foreword to Hindy and Potter's 2005 autobiographical business book "Beer School," former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg credits Brooklyn Brewery with being a key player in supporting the recent rise of an entrepreneurial creative class in Brooklyn, which has helped revitalize the borough.

    Hindy and Potter have taken the good-neighbor approach to developing markets outside of New York City, as well. The brewery created the Brooklyn Mash festival, a celebration of local artists and restaurants that began its second annual tour in Nashville this past March. The festival is making stops in cities across the U.S., as well as in Brooklyn Brewery's growing markets in London and Stockholm.

    "We don't want to make it all about us," Hindy says. "We want to say, 'Let's celebrate your creative class.'"

    How Hindy and Potter tell the brewery's story is important to this approach. Every social media post and even every beer-bottle label is designed to bring customers to the Brooklyn Brewery website, which prominently features a company history that includes essays, photos, and videos. It aims to get customers excited about the people who make the beer they're sipping, Hindy says, which can differentiate the product from the countless other brews on the shelf.

    "Most people have a hankering to start their own business," Hindy explains. "People can relate to an honest story."

    Hindy says Brooklyn Brewery's biggest opportunity is expanding internationally. He aims to grow international exports from 30% of the business today to 50% in the next few years.

    They plan to use the same tactics that worked in Brooklyn to market the brand abroad, like sponsoring a local art show in Paris, for example.

    "We're just doing what we've always done," Hindy says.

    SEE ALSO: There's A Great Xerox Growth Story In Bill Gates' Favorite Business Book

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/brooklyn-brewerys-growth-2014-7

  • Lending Startup Shills 'Super Chill' Loans On Facebook

    Browsing Twitter, we came across the post below. It's a screenshot of an ad from Facebook, promoting loans up to $25,000:

    upstart tweet

    The company behind the ad, Upstart, expanded its focus earlier this year from income share agreements to more traditional, fixed-rate loans for everything from paying off credit card debt to starting a business.

    While its new product might be traditional, its approach is anything but. The difference between Upstart and typical lenders, like banks, is that the startup isn't using just your credit to gauge creditworthiness. Instead, it plugs a potential borrower's academic and work history into an income-prediction algorithm to judge the wisdom of giving a three-year loan of $5,000-$25,000, at interest rates starting below 7%.

    Its similarly non-traditional Facebook page contains references to everything from "New Girl" to "Anchorman," interspersed with pictures of "elite" young employees grinning alongside a tiger, a camel, and a horse.

    Upstart is trying to make loans cool (or "super chill"), but are oversized glasses, a hat straight out of "Portlandia," and a dig at "mainstream consumers" doing the trick? From these Tweets reacting to @BradOFarrell, the company may have to keep at it:

     

    SEE ALSO: This Man's Story Will Scare You Out Of Ever Cosigning A Loan

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/upstart-loans-hipster-ads-2014-7

  • Colgate Reprograms Vending Machines To Remind You To Brush [THE BRIEF]

    Colgate and Y&R Puerto Rico joined forces to send a message to candy consumers by reprogramming a vending machines. Each time someone purchased a candy bar, the machine automatically dished out a free sample of toothpaste while the machine read "Don't forget to brush."

    Deutsch LA was named the new lead creative agency for Pizza Hut on Thursday, Ad Age reports. Deutsch has also worked with another Yum! brand, Taco Bell, in the past.  

    Mashable highlights ten reasons companies should use Vine to help build their brands. Reasons include the potential for creativity with this medium and the fact that its easy to use.

    Jim Beam is the latest company to run a crowdsourcing campaign with its new "Single Barrel Single Statement" contest. Its asking customers of legal drinking age to submit their own words about the product for a chance to have their statements printed on actual bottles of Jim Beam.

    Digiday breaks down Yahoo's ad problems using five charts. Yahoo reported a 7% drop in display-advertising revenue on Tuesday.

    The Drum looks at how YouTube's automated ad system is failing after a "dream job" competition ad ran alongside footage of the horrific Malaysia Airlines MH17 disaster.

    Heineken launched a campaign for Heineken Light starring the loveable Neil Patrick Harris. Extra got a look at the hilarious new spot features the star holding the beer, but he can't actually drink it in the spot because of advertising restrictions.  

    ModCloth, the online clothing site, cut nearly 15% of its staff according to Adweek. The company was apparently looking to expand its mobile business over the past year.    

    Previously on Business Insider Advertising:

     

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/colgate-vending-machines-the-brief-2014-7

  • A Design Firm Wants To Turn Billboards Into Tiny Houses For The Homeless

    billboard


    The modern roadside billboard has been with us for nearly 150 years, and, let's be honest, it needs a bit of a facelift. Not much has changed since its inception  it's still just a big advertisement on legs, distracting you on your commute.

    An architecture and design firm in Slovakia is setting out to change that. DesignDevelop recently unveiled a new project, called Project Gregory, which would convert the nation's traditional triangle-shaped billboards into living spaces, complete with bathrooms, kitchens, and beds.Design Develop interior shelter billboard
    The tiny living spaces could be used to provide housing for the homeless population in the surrounding areas. Whether that makes sense in a practical application sense remains to be seen.Design Develop shelter billboards
    The fee for the ad space would help offset the price of construction, and the firm says that by optimizing the electricity which is already hooked up in order to light the billboards at night, the homes could be powered at no additional cost.

    SEE ALSO: These Bus Benches Transform Into Homeless Shelters In A Matter Of Seconds

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/converting-billboards-into-houses-for-the-homeless-2014-7

  • Here's Amazon's First Ad For The Fire Phone

    Amazon has released the first ad for its hotly anticipated Fire Phone, which goes on sale July 25.

    The ad uses two adorable kids to tout the content people will be able to access on the phone when it comes out: Twitter, Pinterest, Minecraft, and a free one-year subscription to Amazon Prime, the company's free shipping and video game service.

    Mashable reports that a second Fire Phone ad will debut July 24, the day before the phone goes on sale.

    SEE ALSO: This Is Amazon's First Smartphone: The Fire Phone

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/heres-amazons-first-ad-for-the-fire-phone-2014-7

  • How Brooklyn Brewery Tripled Sales In 5 Years Without Traditional Advertising

    steve hindy glass

    There's a good chance you've tried or at least heard of Brooklyn Brewery's products. Its beer is stocked in restaurants, bars, and retailers in 26 U.S. states and 20 countries, and it's on track to sell 270,000 barrels of beer by the end of this year.

    That's why it may surprise you that the company has achieved this success without placing any ads.

    Despite its lack of traditional television, print, and online advertising, Brooklyn Brewery has tripled sales in the past five years. It's done so by sponsoring events in its main distribution regions and telling a story that hooks people.

    "It took us 20 years to get to 100,000 barrels sold [in a year]," brewery cofounder Steve Hindy tells Business Insider, "and just three years to go from that to 200,000." 

    Brooklyn Brewery, founded in 1988, brought in $16 million in revenue in 2008. Last year, the company had $50 million in revenue and sold 216,000 barrels.

    This meteoric growth is partly due to timing. Consumers embracing craft beers over bigger names like Budweiser, the rejuvenation of Brooklyn, and the rise of social media all contributed. But Hindy says the seeds were planted from the very beginning, 26 years ago.

    When Hindy founded the company with Tom Potter, they didn't have enough money for traditional advertising, but even once they had more funds, they realized it wasn't for them. They tried a series of radio ads on sports radio in the early 2000s, which Hindy says "never really felt right."

    Instead, the pair decided to take a more grassroots approach and grow the brand through word of mouth. They wanted their customers to discover it themselves at an event or in a bar, hoping it would give them a sense of ownership.

    Rather than commercials, they invested in community outreach. This entailed sponsoring local art events in Brooklyn and led to relationships with organizations like the Brooklyn Museum and the Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM). Those who attended these events would get free beer and the local business owners and artists running the events would appreciate the support and keep in touch.

    "The board can't quantify being a good neighbor," Hindy says with a laugh, "but it's been very satisfying for us."

    kegging line

    In the foreword to Hindy and Potter's 2005 autobiographical business book "Beer School," former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg credits Brooklyn Brewery with being a key player in supporting the recent rise of an entrepreneurial creative class in Brooklyn, which has helped revitalize the borough.

    Hindy and Potter have taken the good-neighbor approach to developing markets outside of New York City, as well. The brewery created the Brooklyn Mash festival, a celebration of local artists and restaurants that began its second annual tour in Nashville this past March. The festival is making stops in cities across the U.S., as well as in Brooklyn Brewery's growing markets in London and Stockholm.

    "We don't want to make it all about us," Hindy says. "We want to say, 'Let's celebrate your creative class.'"

    How Hindy and Potter tell the brewery's story is important to this approach. Every social media post and even every beer-bottle label is designed to bring customers to the Brooklyn Brewery website, which prominently features a company history that includes essays, photos, and videos. It aims to get customers excited about the people who make the beer they're sipping, Hindy says, which can differentiate the product from the countless other brews on the shelf.

    "Most people have a hankering to start their own business," Hindy explains. "People can relate to an honest story."

    Hindy says Brooklyn Brewery's biggest opportunity is expanding internationally. He aims to grow international exports from 30% of the business today to 50% in the next few years.

    They plan to use the same tactics that worked in Brooklyn to market the brand abroad, like sponsoring a local art show in Paris, for example.

    "We're just doing what we've always done," Hindy says.

    SEE ALSO: There's A Great Xerox Growth Story In Bill Gates' Favorite Business Book

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/brooklyn-brewerys-growth-2014-7

  • Twitter's Plan To Steal Ad Dollars From TV Hits A Snag (TWTR)

    Dick Costolo Twitter Portrait IllustrationA new report from Ad Age's Jeanine Poggi contains some good news and some bad news for Twitter.

    On the one hand, Poggi reports that Twitter's Amplify program, which allows brands to run a promoted tweet containing a short video of an ongoing television event, has been a big success when used during live events like sports and awards shows.

    On the other, brands and networks tell Poggi that Amplify has not caught on as much with viewers when used during scripted television.

    While Heineken added 2,300 followers from a campaign centered one the U.S. Open tennis tournament, A&E has run just one Amplify campaign since signing up to try the product when it launched in May 2013.

    If nothing else, the news highlights the friction that exists between Twitter and its TV partners as they fight to make money off of a fragmented television audience that does not come together around one program in the numbers they once did.  

    In a sense, the struggles the Amplify product have faced mirror what is happening in television as a whole: live events like sports are drawing huge numbers while scripted programs are increasingly being watched via time-shifting methods like DVR and Hulu.

    As a result, Ad Age reports, some brands are thinking about scaling back on TV advertising to spend money on Amplify tweets, rather than making an additional outlay for Amplify on top of their current levels of TV spending.

    Here's how a TV executive phrased it to Ad Age

    "Initially we were excited about Amplify as a way to get incremental revenue. We bought into the premise," the first TV executive said. "But when we went into the marketplace we were surprised sponsors didn't find value in it and they didn't want to spend extra. Some suggested reducing their buy with the network to give portion to Twitter, which of course didn't sit well for us."

    Though Pivotal Research Group analyst Brian Wieser told Ad Age that Amplify represents only a small sliver of Twitter's revenues, the report serves as an interesting example of a story we've been talking about here for a while.

    Twitter has worked hard to forge a complementary relationship with television, both by offering networks access to its social analytics and by allowing advertisers to boost their TV buys by simultaneously running promoted tweets. But the social media company's end-game remains as it has always been: to grow its own $1 billion-a-year ad business by stealing the ad money that has traditionally gone to TV.

    Read Poggi's full story at Ad Age >> 

    SEE ALSO: Facebook Wants To Kill TV; Twitter Merely Wants To Steal From It

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-twitter-can-steal-tv-ad-budgets-2014-7

  • SOCIAL BIG DATA: Each Social Network Is Using A Very Different Data Lens To Understand Users And Target Advertising

    BII social logins

    The average global internet user spends two and a half hours daily on social media, and information on their activity — gathered under the catch-all 'big data' — reveals a great deal about what makes them tick.

    Now, social networks are making significant investments in putting this data to work to deliver personalized content, and help advertisers hyper-target users. 

    In a recent report from BI Intelligence, we take a close look at the kinds of information each of the biggest social networks collects on its users, and how that data fits into the overall strategy of each network. Each social network has a distinct character, and views its users through a very different data lens, which informs ad and content targeting. By understanding each social network's data profile, marketers and developers can better gauge which social network is better for their purposes. 

    Access the Full Report By Signing Up For A Free Trial Today > > 

    Here are some of the unique pieces of data each social network is collecting:

    • Facebook's interest/social graph: The world's largest online community collects more data via its API than any other social network. Facebook's "like" button is pressed 2.7 billion times every day across the web, revealing what people care about. 
    • Google+'s relevance graph: The number of "+1s" and other Google+ data are now a top factor in determining how a Web page ranks in Google search results.
    • LinkedIn's talent graph: At least 22% of LinkedIn users have between 500-999 first-degree connections on the social network, and 19% have between 301-499.The rich professional data is helping LinkedIn build a "talent graph."
    • Twitter's news graph: At its peak late last year the social network was processing 143,199 tweets per second globally. This firehose of tweets provide a real-time window into the news and information that people care about. Fifty-two percent of Twitter users in the U.S. consume news on the site (more than the percent who do so on Facebook), according to Pew.
    • Pinterest's commerce graph: More than 17% of all pinboards are categorized under "Home," while roughly 12% fall under style or fashion, these are windows into people's tastes and fashion trends. 
    • YouTube's entertainment graph: What music, shows, and celebrities do we like? YouTube reaches more U.S. adults aged 18 to 34 than any single cable network, according to Nielsen. YouTube knows what they like to watch. 
    • Yelp's and Foursquare's location graphs: These apps know where we've been and where we'll go. Foursquare has over 45 million users and 5 billion location check-ins. 

    In full, the report:

    To access all BI Intelligence's charts, data, and analysis on the digital media industry, sign up for a free trial.

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/social-network-big-data-lens-2014-7

  • What We Need To Do To Make Online Viewability Standards Work

    Man Blue Eye

    Transforming a $50b ad marketplace is no easy feat – especially when it comes to shifting our industry currency from served impressions to viewable ones.

    And while promoting viewability is a worthy goal, we kid ourselves if we think the Media Rating Council’s recent standards come even close to putting the issue to bed.  

    The MRC’s rulings for both display and online video ads have largely been perceived as a much-needed assist for digital marketers searching for solid inventory – ie, stronger ROI. They’re a win for the industry, right? 

    For us as a publisher, however, the MRC’s recent rulings trigger almost as many questions as they seem to answer. The industry has to honestly address some fairly complicated issues before we can actually turn the corner on this long-standing problem.

    Here are just a few of the questions we believe need to be tackled before the industry can claim any true measure of success when it comes to serving ads that advertisers want:

    1. Are we looking to correct a wrong – or just make incremental improvements?

      Advertisers and agencies have traditionally taken the position that their expectation of viewability is at or near 100%. They have assumed that nearly ALL of the ads they purchase are being seen. By that reasoning, a site with only 80% viewability would therefore “owe” an advertiser 20% more impressions (well, actually more than that) at the same price. How, then, would measuring viewability impact pricing? While viewability measurement can be a valuable tool for identifying bad actors, does this mean that publishers with strong viewability metrics could charge a premium over standard rates? And what happens when wild discrepancies are found? (For instance, I’ve heard reports by some advertisers who’ve found partners serving less than 10% of a campaign in view.)
    2. What is the responsibility of third-party ad servers?

      While publishers should be focused on increasingly viewability, for this to be achieved, rich media vendors need to speed up their ad delivery times. Though a publisher can do everything right – the page loads quickly, ad calls are served asynchronously, etc – if a vendor’s ad takes 5+ (!!) seconds to load, there’s not much a publisher can do to compensate. The bottom line is that our business should also account for – and attempt to address – the too frequent failure to serve ads faster than it takes a viewer to scroll down a page.
    3. And what about the “tricky” stuff?

      “Viewable” ads don’t exist in a silo. Many legacy issues must be addressed – for instance, the notion of “above the fold,” competitive separation, roadblocks and more. We need to come to a common understanding of what these mean in light of viewability. How do we, um, view continuous scrolling in which ads are served as a visitor moves down the page? And if an advertiser has purchased a roadblock, does that mean it should own every impression on that page? If a brand has competitive separation requirements, do they apply to ads served further down the page – even thousands of pixels away?

    We don't mean to suggest that these hard-to-answer questions mean that achieving viewability isn’t doable or that it’s not a worthy goal. It’s certainly necessary, as no brand can achieve success with a campaign that goes largely unseen, despite even a well-executed message and the benefits of modern targeting. 

    We do, however, believe that the industry needs to take a more holistic – and fairer –approach in advocating for more viewability, one which more fully takes into account the realities about how ads are served today.

    SEE ALSO: Publishers: Don't Screw Up Your Programmatic Strategy

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/making-online-viewability-standards-work-2014-7

  • A Study Of World Cup Tweets Reveals Important Insights About The Demographics Of Soccer

    Screen Shot 2014 07 17 at 10.40.36 AM

    Madison Avenue and brand marketers around the globe are taking stock after a World Cup that broke records online and in the ratings.

    The tournament — and soccer generally — has proven itself to be the ultimate second screen event; Sunday’s final between Germany and Argentina broke Twitter’s tweet-per-minute record and 672 million tweets were sent throughout the tournament.

    The sport’s global popularity and dramatic scoring events, combined with the light TV ad load (6 minutes per game vs. 32 minutes for the average NBA game), made the social TV one of the primary ways that brands could communicate with the global audience. According to Visible Measures, a total of 671 million video views were racked up by the top 97 social campaigns around the World Cup.

    The legacy of this World Cup isn’t limited to those brand exposures. Record levels of social interaction also leave behind a vast trove of data that reveal the true nature of the World Cup audience, both at home and around the world.

    As American brands ramp up year-round coverage of Major League Soccer and the Barclays Premier League, there is much to learn from understanding who tweeted about the World Cup and where. And frankly, the market research implications aren’t limited to soccer. Increasingly, all major live TV events leave behind a stream of millions of tweets that can provide valuable and granular insights for advertisers far beyond the overnight ratings.

    Throughout the Cup, our firm Echelon Insights broke down a sample of tens of millions of World Cup tweets by country, by market, by city, by language spoken, and through data modeling, projected interest down to the ZIP code level.

    Going beyond surface-level uses of social data (like tweets per minute or sentiment scores) we wanted to understand where soccer was penetrating the U.S. market, and where it wasn’t. We honed in specifically on the share of World Cup tweets as a share of overall tweets to get the best apples-to-apples read on the strength of the social TV audience.

    Some of the findings aren’t shocking — soccer is huge among Spanish speakers in the U.S. — but others identify niche opportunities for advertisers and brands that aren’t as easily quantified by traditional market research.

    
Spawn of Soccer Moms Rise

    In the mid-1990s, “soccer moms” were one of the most coveted political demographics. In 2014, their kids are all grown up, in college or entering the workforce. The data shows signs of strong interest amongst today’s millennials who grew up playing in youth leagues.

    Our study didn’t specifically measure for millennials, but their footprint was unmistakable. College towns — even in the sleepy days of summer — were among the most consistently overperforming cities when it came to their likelihood to tweet about the World Cup.

    Performanced ranged from 69% above average in college-heavy markets like Gainesville, Florida, to 44% above average in Madison, Wisconsin to 26% above average in Lexington, Kentucky. (Since we were looking at share-of-voice as opposed to tweet volume, we controlled for millennials’ tendency to tweet more in general.) This conclusion is borne out by Facebook data, where 18-24 year olds overindex for soccer interests by nearly 100%.

    Takeaway: Looking to build awareness of your brand amongst millennials? Then soccer provides one of the most efficient sports-related plays.

    Luxury Brands Take Note

    The soccer audience is a potentially lucrative one for marketers. We ran a regression analysis on the World Cup’s share of voice in more than 2,000 cities. Median income came back as the strongest predictor of soccer interest, followed by the percentage of households with children. Suburban locales with bigger homes and younger families often performed best in our Twitter index of World Cup activity -- including places like Reston in the Virginia suburbs of D.C., northern New Jersey, and Cary outside of Raleigh.

    Takeaway: Traditional mainstays and athletic brands like Adidas dominated the airwaves around the World Cup, but the data suggests potential opportunities for luxury brands catering to families and an affluent clientele.

    Will Bilingual Marketing Go Social?

    Univision has already been dubbed the winner of this World Cup, delivering 35% of the total audience for the final. In key markets, and for certain games (like the Netherlands vs. Mexico), Univision routinely outdelivered ABC or ESPN.

    This impressive TV performance was matched on social media. During the Final, 44% of Spanish-language tweets in the U.S. mentioned the game versus 24% for English speakers. This compares to nationwide World Cup Final conversation levels of 46% in Mexico, 45% in finalist Argentina, and 45% in Spain. Social data points to a Latino community in the U.S. that’s every bit as enthused about the game as any country in the world.

    Takeaway: Without a bilingual component, social campaigns around the World Cup and soccer leave as much as a third of the potential U.S. audience on the table.

    The MLS Effect

    Soccer enthusiasts have been predicting the sport’s rise in the U.S. for decades. If there has been progress towards that end, the numbers suggest that Major League Soccer may have had something to do with it. Nationally, social interest in the World Cup was nearly 19% higher in MLS markets than in non-MLS markets, and in those markets, the highest performers are the hometowns of Real Salt Lake (overindexing by 35%), D.C. United (34%), and Sporting Kansas City (29%). The largest market without an MLS team to show such elevated interest was Miami — whose David Beckham-led expansion franchise may get off the ground in 2017.

    Takeaway: As demographics (the rise of Millennials and Hispanics) serve to lift’s soccer’s popularity in the U.S. over time, local MLS teams are also providing an assist, especially in small to mid-sized markets. As the MLS and international leagues builds audience in the U.S., they can provide an attractive vehicle for reaching these rising demographic cohorts.

    Patrick Ruffini is a partner and co-founder of Echelon Insights, a market research and digital intelligence company based in Washington, D.C.

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/world-cup-demographics-2014-7

  • Retargeting Company Triggit Is Making A 'Big Bet' On Native Advertising

    zach coelius triggit

    The online advertising company Triggit announced today that it has been testing a way to expand the retargeted native ads it runs on Facebook to other sites across the web.

    Triggit works with retail brands and other direct-response advertisers to market products to customers on Facebook based on a prior history of searing for those products online.

    By dropping a cookie on Nordstrom's website, for instance, Triggit and other retargeting companies can help the store place an ad in your Facebook newsfeed for a pair of shoes you'd been browsing earlier in the day.

    Triggit CEO Zach Coelius says his company has spent the past six months testing similar in-stream ads on sites across the web. Since web users have learned to ignore banner ads, Coelius says that native ads, which appear organically within the flow of a user's web experience, will be increasingly popular moving forward. 

    “We’re making a big bet that retargeting and native will be a big deal,” Coelius said in an interview.

    So far, Coelius says Triggit's testing has been hugely successful. Triggit said it determined the program's success by keeping three things in mind.

    First, it needed to ensure that people actually clicked on the ads. Then, it wanted to see that users actually bought something once they clicked. And finally, for the sake of the advertisers and publishers, Triggit needed to monitor what an effective cost per thousand impressions, or CPM, would be for a publisher running these ads.

    Triggit found that CPM for publishers ran at a good range, about $5-10 CPM, with retargeted native ads. According to the company's website, this system has also driven click-through rates, or CTRs, that are 15 times higher than those of banner ads. 

    The process to create such a successful program has been so lengthy because as Coelius explains, there are about 100 different types of ads that can run, unlike running a banner ad or an ad on Facebook, depending on the publisher.

    "A native ad on Yahoo looks very different than, say, a sponsored tweet, which looks different than a Pinterest ad," Coelius said. "So to support that as a retargeting company, you need to be able to run and create ads on all these different formats, which is very challenging and it took a long time for us to build the technology."

    Now that the company has launched its beta program, it plans to extend its services beyond the Facebook news feed and help companies across the web boost their ROIs.  

    SEE ALSO: Online Video Advertising Is Growing Many Times Faster Than TV, Search, And Most Other Digital Ad Markets

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    Details: http://www.businessinsider.com/future-of-retargeted-advertising-2014-7

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